Research projects on offer

Our Sydney network of quantum experts are seeking PhD, Honours and Master students to work on a variety of quantum science and technology research projects. Projects suit both experimentalists or theorists, and driven individuals with backgrounds across a range of disciplines such as physics, computer science, engineering, chemistry or mathematics.

Here are a few of the research opportunities on offer in Sydney. You can also browse the list of experts from our partner universities to identify potential supervisors to contact direct.

University of Technology Sydney (UTS)

Supervisor: Professor Michael Bremner - michael.bremner@uts.edu.au

 

Project information: Over the next decade quantum processors are expected to grow in capability, transitioning from the small and imprecise processors of today towards devices that will have thousands of components in non-trivial configurations. Until we can manufacture devices that are fully fault-tolerant, the development of applications will require significant levels of error mitigation and device-dependent compiling. In this project, you will create new methods for scaling up error-mitigation, circuit compilation, and error-correction for the next generations of quantum processors. This project will also examine techniques for aligning algorithm performance with the characteristics of a quantum processor architecture.

This project is based within the UTS Centre for Quantum Software and Information and is a part of the Quantum Algorithms and Complexity Program of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T). The CQC2T is headquartered at the University of New South Wales and comprises more than 200 researchers based at the University of New South Wales, University of Technology Sydney, The University of Queensland, The Australian National University, The University of Melbourne, Griffith University, and RMIT. The CQC2T has over 30 industrial and academic partner organizations both in Australia and around the world.

 

This project would suit: Students who are interested in theoretical quantum computing with a background in computer science, mathematics, or physics.

 

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://www.cqc2t.org/quantum-algorithms-and-complexity-program/

Supervisor: Professor Michael Bremner - michael.bremner@uts.edu.au

Project information: Over the next decade quantum processors are expected to grow in capability, transitioning from the small and imprecise processors of today towards devices that will have thousands of components in non-trivial configurations. Until we can manufacture devices that are fully fault-tolerant, the development of applications will require significant levels of error mitigation and device-dependent compiling. In this project, you will create new methods for scaling up error-mitigation, circuit compilation, and error-correction for the next generations of quantum processors. This project will also examine techniques for aligning algorithm performance with the characteristics of a quantum processor architecture.

This project is based within the UTS Centre for Quantum Software and Information and is a part of the Quantum Algorithms and Complexity Program of the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T). The CQC2T is headquartered at the University of New South Wales and comprises more than 200 researchers based at the University of New South Wales, University of Technology Sydney, The University of Queensland, The Australian National University, The University of Melbourne, Griffith University, and RMIT. The CQC2T has over 30 industrial and academic partner organizations both in Australia and around the world.

This project would suit: Students who are interested in theoretical quantum computing with a background in computer science, mathematics, or physics.

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://www.cqc2t.org/quantum-algorithms-and-complexity-program/

Supervisor: Dr Mehran Kianinia - mehran.kianinia@uts.edu.au

Project information: In this project, the quantum optic properties of single photon emitters in hBN will be investigated through a range of techniques such as cryogenic photoluminescence spectroscopy, quantum interference measurement to demonstrate indistinguishable photons from quantum emitters in hBN, which is the basic requirement for application in quantum technologies such as quantum computing and quantum communication.

This project would suit: Students with general background in optic and/or electrical engineering with the interest in quantum optic field is preferred.

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://www.uts.edu.au/about/faculty-science/quantum-materials-and-nanophotonics

Supervisor: Dr Maria Kieferova - maria.kieferova@uts.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Prof Michael Bremner

Project information: This project will explore the power and applications of generative machine learning both in the context of near-term and fault-tolerant quantum computation. The goal of the project will be to develop new approaches to quantum machine learning and establishing their strengths and limitation. The work will be predominantly theoretical in nature but include numerical studies and demonstrations on quantum computing prototypes when appropriate.

This project would suit: The requirements are strong mathematical background, ability to program in Python and a degree in maths, physics, computer science or equivalent.

For more information, contact the project supervisor.

Supervisor: A/Prof Nathan Langford - nathan.langford@uts.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Dr JP Dehollain

Project information: In this project, the student will develop a proposal for an experiment to study simple quantum phase transitions using small-scale digital quantum simulators in circuit QED. Using QuanGuru (https://github.com/CirQuS-UTS/QuanGuru), a Python-based quantum dynamics simulation software suite developed in the Langford lab, the student will study the ideal model and a circuit QED realisation. The student will model the system, and identify experimentally realisable operating parameters and dynamical performance signatures for use in the lab. In carrying out this project, the student will receive an introduction into key considerations for implementing digital quantum simulations in circuit QED systems, and develop a full experimental proposal for fabrication and testing.

This project would suit: We encourage applicants with an excellent undergraduate degree in an appropriate subject area, such as physics or maths. Coding experience and strong results in undergraduate courses in quantum physics and other relevant subject areas would be beneficial.

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://profiles.uts.edu.au/nathan.langford

Supervisor:A/Prof Nathan Langford - nathan.langford@uts.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Dr JP Dehollain (UTS), A/Prof Daniel Burgarth (MQ), A/Prof Dominic Berry (MQ)

Project information: This project is part of our exciting new ARC-funded research grant, where we aim to enhance high-tech quantum simulators to meet the demands of computer-modelling intensive industries such as drug and vaccine design. By developing innovative digitisation and control techniques for simulating the behaviour of complex quantum systems, a task that is generally impossible to solve with classical computing technology, this project aims to help shape the design of future quantum computers and maximise the modelling power of current industry-scale processors built by companies like Google, IBM and Australian start-up, Silicon Quantum Computing.

In this project, you will work in a state-of-the-art circuit QED laboratory under the supervision of A/Prof Nathan Langford and Dr JP Dehollain, and collaborate with leading local and international quantum theorists. You will develop and test key elements of new and state-of-the-art digitisation techniques for quantum simulations and control, studying threshold behaviours in digitisation performance and developing experimental techniques for higher-order digitisation. You will develop strong experimental skills in quantum device design, simulation, fabrication and characterisation, cryogenic microwave measurements, and expertise in quantum information theory and algorithms.

Quantum computing is shaping up to be one of the most influential high-tech industries of the 21st century, with a large and growing global industry, start-up and academic community constantly searching for new talent with training and technical skills in quantum technologies research. This PhD will provide exactly the training and skills you need to join the quantum technologies revolution and secure a place in this exciting growth industry.

The stipend for this project is available only for Australian domestic students.

This project would suit: We encourage applicants with an excellent Honours or Master's degree in an appropriate subject area, such as physics or engineering, and strong results in undergraduate courses in quantum physics and other relevant subject areas. The funding for this project is eligible for Australian domestic students only.

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit:

https://profiles.uts.edu.au/nathan.langford and https://www.uts.edu.au/scholarship/advanced-digitisation-techniques-and-threshold-effects-experimental-quantum-simulators

Supervisor: A/Prof Nathan Langford - nathan.langford@uts.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Dr JP Dehollain

Project information: In the wake of recent groundbreaking progress in building better-than-classical quantum processors, circuit QED systems based on nanofabricated superconducting quantum circuits have emerged as the leading experimental platform for scaleable quantum computing, with major quantum computing efforts from global tech companies like Google, IBM, Huawei and Baidu.

In our group, we build experimental circuit QED based quantum processors to study key technologies for quantum computing, like quantum simulations and quantum control. Our research interests cover a broad range of areas, like digitisation techniques for quantum simulations, quantum measurement and feedback, quantum device characterisation and control, device modelling, quantum fundamentals, open and driven quantum systems, quantum chaos and microwave-to-optical frequency conversion. We work with a number of collaborators across the Sydney basin, including A/Profs Daniel Burgarth and Dominic Berry at Macquarie University, and A/Prof Chris Ferrie at UTS.

We welcome applications from talented and diverse students for projects across any of our research focus areas. Please make contact to discuss possible projects. We are happy to support both international and domestic students in applications for full PhD stipends through the SQA and UTS.

This project would suit: We encourage applicants with an excellent Honours or Master's degree in an appropriate subject area, such as physics or engineering, and strong results in undergraduate courses in quantum physics and other relevant subject areas. We welcome both domestic and international student applicants.

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://profiles.uts.edu.au/nathan.langford

Supervisor: A/Prof Nathan Langford - nathan.langford@uts.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Dr JP Dehollain

Project information: Moore’s law is dead, because classical digital electronics has hit the quantum regime! Quantum computing is making headlines globally for a new computer revolution, with major research programs at the world’s largest IT tech giants (Google, IBM, Microsoft, etc) and circuit QED (superconducting quantum electronics) is a leading platform in the race [Devoret & Schoelkopf, Science (2013)].

The first, most important application of quantum computers will be to perform digital quantum simulations of complex systems [Cirac & Zoller, Nat Phys (2012)]. Here, you will study small-scale circuit QED simulators [Langford et al, Nat Comms (2017)], to develop hardware-level routines for industrial quantum computers of the future.

Sydney is a world-leading quantum computing hub, with both research centres and industry groups. If you want a taste of a research or industry career in this exciting field, join Sydney’s only circuit QED lab for Honours. You will work in a new, international group of PhD students, postdocs and academics who are setting up a state-of-the-art circuit QED lab for cryogenic microwave experiments covering all necessary high-tech quantum science & engineering skills. Depending on taste, a range of projects available include: design of millikelvin quantum amplifiers (used across top solid-state quantum computing platforms); superconducting thin-film fabrication and characterisation; superconducting qubit design and characterisation; quantum experiment simulation (on-chip quantum phase transitions).

This project would suit: We encourage applicants with an excellent undergraduate degree in an appropriate subject area, such as physics, engineering or maths, and strong results in undergraduate courses in quantum physics and other relevant subject areas.

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://profiles.uts.edu.au/nathan.langford

Supervisor: Dr Peter Rohde - peter.rohde@uts.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Dr Simon Devitt

Project information: As classical computing has only reached its full potential with the emergence of the internet, it is expected that the full potential of quantum computing will not be realised until they are interconnected via a future quantum internet.

The goal of this project is to develop the protocols necessary to deploy global quantum communications infrastructure to enable future cloud-based quantum computing and determine the most economically viable means for its rollout.

This project would suit: Quantum computing, computer networking, quantum information theory, quantum cryptography

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/quantum-internet/8C8C709D5A393D16765116587A4E8A2C

Supervisor: Prof Milos Toth - milos.toth@uts.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Prof. Igor Aharanovic

Project information: The research is focused on fabrication and manipulation of single photon emitters (i.e., quantum emitters) in 2D materials, fabrication of optoelectronic devices based on the emitters, and deployment of the emitters in photonic circuits. A broad introduction to the field can be found in Nature Photonics 10, 631 (2016). Specific projects appropriate for individual students will be selected in consultation with the supervisor.

This project would suit: Quantum technologies, nanophotonics, optoelectronics, nanofabrication, materials physics.

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://www.uts.edu.au/about/faculty-science/quantum-materials-and-nanophotonics

 

Supervisor: A/Prof Alexander Solntsev - Alexander.Solntsev@uts.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Igor Aharonovich

Project information: UTS Centre for Quantum Materials and Nanophotonics is the birthplace of single-photon emitters based on boron nitride. This platform provides on-demand single photons with exceptional brightness and purity at room temperature. In the last few years, we have developed a range of technologies to integrate these emitters with modern protonic chips. Now we are exploring the opportunities of utilising this technology for quantum information applications, which will form the basis of this experimental project in quantum optics.

This project would suit: Students with interest in experimental quantum optics

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://www.uts.edu.au/about/faculty-science/quantum-materials-and-nanophotonics

Supervisor: A/Prof Alexander Solntsev - Alexander.Solntsev@uts.edu.au

Project information: Entangled photons form the basis of quantum optics, enabling a range of applications in secure telecommunication, optical quantum computing and quantum-enhanced sensing. In the last 2 years, we have learned how to generate and manipulate entangled photons on the nanoscale: in nano-resonators and meta-surfaces. This project will focus on developing theory and performing numerical analysis in this new and largely unexplored area of quantum optics.

This project would suit: Students with interest in theoretical quantum optics

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41566-021-00793-z

UNSW Sydney

Supervisor: Professor Alex Hamilton - alex.hamilton@unsw.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Dr. Scott Liles

Project information: The aim of this project is to fabricate and study semiconductor quantum dot devices that exploit the properties of semiconductor holes for spin quantum bits.

In the past decade, intense research has been devoted in trapping electrons in semiconductor quantum dots, initially to study the fundamental properties of artificial atoms, and subsequently to use the spin of the electrons as the basis for quantum information technologies.

To date almost all research has focussed on the properties of electrons in semiconductor quantum dots. Recently it has been shown that using positively charged semiconductor holes, rather than negatively charged electrons, brings significant advantages – as well as revealing much unexplored new physics. The aim of this project is to study holes trapped in semiconductor quantum dots, to determine how (and why) holes are so different than electrons, and to use holes to make quantum bits. Experiments will be conducted at ultra-low temperatures, using ultra-low noise electrical measurement  and control techniques. The project involves collaborations with leading Australian and international research groups, and may require international travel to visit collaborators overseas.

This project would suit: Students interested in physics, Electrical Engineering.

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://www.phys.unsw.edu.au/qed

Supervisor: Professor Alex Hamilton - alex.hamilton@unsw.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Dr. Karina Hudson

Project information: This project will fabricate and test a new class of semiconductor devices in which topological “Majorana modes” (quantum states with entirely new properties) can be engineered. Topological quantum states hold promise for a new generation of electronics and class of quantum computing. Topological Majorana Zero modes can be engineered in semiconductor quantum wires by coupling them to superconductors.

The new approach exploits recent breakthroughs in materials growth and theoretical physics to create ultra-low disorder semiconductor nanowires that use holes, instead of electrons, to operate. Holes have very different spin properties than electrons, which can be exploited to engineer robust topological phases.

The project will be conducted in the ARC Centre of Excellence FLEET at UNSW, and will involve fabricating semiconductor nanowires interfaced to superconductors, and low-temperature, low-noise electrical transport measurements to demonstrate the existence of topological quantum states.

This project would suit: Students interested in Physics, Electrical Engineering, Materials Science

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://www.phys.unsw.edu.au/qed

Supervisor: Professor Alex Hamilton - alex.hamilton@unsw.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Dr. Feixiang Xiang

Project information: Graphene is a wonder material made of a single layer of carbon atoms in a honeycomb lattice. The study of graphene and other atomically thin (2D) materials has exploded into one of the hottest topics in modern physics, resulting in the Nobel Prize in 2010. Graphene has remarkable electrical properties: electrons in graphene behave as massless Dirac particles, like photons or neutrinos, and can travel for long distances without scattering. This makes graphene an ideal candidate for post silicon electronics.

Symmetry arguments show that these properties are not just limited to graphene, but appear naturally in a variety of 2D lattice structures. This project will study the emergence of Dirac fermions in systems other than natural graphene, in which the lattice is created artificially using electron beam lithography techniques. Spin-orbit interactions can then be used to tune the system into a topologically non-trivial regime, such as a topological insulator (Physics Nobel 2016).

The project will be conducted in the ARC Centre of Excellence FLEET at UNSW, and will involve fabrication facilities of the Australian National Nanofabrication Facility at UNSW. The research will also use specialised low-temperature and high magnetic field measurement systems to perform quantum transport measurements and examine the transport properties of the semiconductor nanostructures. The project will draw upon UNSW’s strengths in nanofabrication and quantum devices, as well as collaborations with the University of Cambridge, TU Delft, and others.

This project would suit: Physics, Electrical Engineering, Materials Science

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://www.phys.unsw.edu.au/qed 

Supervisor: Professor Robert Malaney - r.malaney@unsw.edu.au

Project information: Quantum-enabled timing measurements within the context of satellite-based observations opens new advancements within space-engineering such as highly-synchronised quantum networks, enhanced GPS, enhanced atomic-interferometers, and novel Earth observation technologies. Within the context of basic science, it opens windows of exploration across gravitational-wave-detection, dark-matter investigations, alternate cosmologies, and tests of fundamental physics. In this research, you will investigate the use of quantum technology as a means to bring satellite-based timing measurements into the femto-second regime. Your initial work will determine the scales over which the advantage offered by quantum effects survive the rigours of real-world space environments. You will be joining a high-profile team of ten theoretical and experimental researchers led by Prof. R. Malaney whose work in the area of global quantum networks has recently been awarded Best Paper at the IEEE's Flagship  International Conference on Communications. This research is part of a wider project sponsored by NASA and Northrop Grumman Corporation, and you should expect to obtain an outstanding education at the forefront of space communications.

This project would suit: A First Class Honours Degree in Engineering or Physics is Required.

Supervisor: Dr Hendra Nurdin - h.nurdin@unsw.edu.au

Project information: The aim of this project is to develop new methods for identifying classes of quantum noise models, beyond the ubiquitous quantum Markov models, from empirical data, and developing new feedback control strategies for mitigating quantum noise in this class, for instance for application in quantum error correction.

This project would suit: Keen interest in challenging interdisciplinary work combining elements of physics, control theory, statistical modelling and mathematical physics.

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://research.unsw.edu.au/people/dr-hendra-i-nurdin

Supervisor: Dr Hendra Nurdin - h.nurdin@unsw.edu.au

Project information: Linear systems theory lies at the heart of modern control theory. Linear quantum systems are the quantum analogue of classical linear systems and are important for linear processing of quantum signals, quantum Gaussian operations and linear quantum sensing. A prominent example of linear quantum systems are gravitational wave interferometers. This project will explore the application of advanced linear quantum systems theory for enhancing linear quantum sensing devices.

This project would suit: Keen interest in challenging interdisciplinary work combining elements of physics, control theory, statistical modelling and mathematical physics.

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://research.unsw.edu.au/people/dr-hendra-i-nurdin

Supervisor: Dr Jarryd Pla - jarryd@unsw.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Professor Andrea Morello

Project information: This project aims to combine high-performance superconducting quantum-limited parametric amplifiers that utilize kinetic inductance, developed in our labs at UNSW, with ultra-coherent ensembles of donor spins in silicon. Highly squeezed states of microwave light produced by the kinetic inductance parametric amplifier (KIPA) will be mapped onto a donor spin ensemble, generating squeezed spin states that can be used for magnetometry and to probe many-body entanglement inside a semiconductor device. The student will have opportunities to engage with all aspects of the project, from superconductor and semiconductor device fabrication, to experiment and theory.

This project would suit: Students with a background in Electrical Engineering or Physics who are interested in an experemential thesis working with hybrid systems of spins and superconducting circuits.

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://dataportal.arc.gov.au/NCGP/Web/Grant/Grant/DP210103769

Supervisor: Dr Jarryd Pla - jarryd@unsw.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Professor Andrea Morello

Project information: Single photon detectors are widely available components in the optical domain, allowing a vast range of applications including quantum information processing and quantum key distribution. Conventional single optical photon detectors based on photomultipliers, avalanche diodes and transition-edge sensors are simple to use and offer low dark count rates and good detection efficiencies. Developing such tools in the microwave domain is a great challenge, as the energy of a single microwave photon is typically four orders of magnitude smaller than that of its optical counterpart. Whilst there has been much interest recently in building such a tool, a simple-to-use high efficiency detector of microwave photons is an outstanding goal. This project aims to design, fabricate and measure a superconducting-based single microwave photon detector. The detector will utilise quantum-limited parametric amplifier technology pioneered at UNSW and operate analogously to optical photomultipliers and transition edge sensors. This is predominantly an experimental project and will involve superconducting device fabrication and cryogenic, high-frequency measurements.

This project would suit: Students with a background in Electrical Engineering or Physics who are interested in an experimental thesis working on photon detectors in the microwave domain.

Supervisor: Dr Jarryd Pla - jarryd@unsw.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Professor Andrew Dzurak

Project information: Quantum-limited parametric amplifiers are devices which can boost the strength of a signal whilst only adding the minimum amount of noise required by quantum mechanics. Typically, parametric amplifiers are made by placing a nonlinear element (which facilitate the parametric processes that lead to amplification) inside a cavity, or by creating long transmission lines with many instances of the nonlinearity (so called traveling wave amplifiers). Traveling wave geometries are attractive, since they offer amplification over wide frequency ranges, as opposed to cavity amplifiers which operate within a narrow resonant band. State-of-the-art traveling wave amplifiers in the microwave domain can use Josephson junctions as the nonlinear element, or the kinetic inductance intrinsic to thin superconducting films. Kinetic inductance traveling wave amplifiers have gained much attention recently, since they provide near-quantum-limited noise performance and exhibit dynamic ranges that are several orders of magnitude larger than their Josephson junction counterparts. This opens up many exciting possibilities, from multiplexed readout of large qubit arrays in quantum computers, to quantum-limited spin resonance spectroscopy. However, kinetic inductance amplifiers suffer from long physical lengths, ranging from tens of centimeters to several meters long, which poses significant fabrication and experimental challenges. This project aims to miniaturize kinetic inductance based traveling wave parametric amplifiers, reducing dimensions down to those only typically seen in Josephson junction devices. This will provide compact amplifiers and allow new devices that operate at RF frequencies (i.e. < 1 GHz), which is of great interest to experiments in quantum computing and nuclear magnetic resonance.

This project would suit: Students with a background in Electrical Engineering or Physics who are interested in an experimental thesis working on microwave quantum-noise-limited amplifiers.

Supervisor: A/Prof Rajib Rahman - rajib.rahman@unsw.edu.au

Project information: We want to perform simulations of hole based qubits in Si and Ge from our in-house tools and techniques, and understand the properties of these emerging qubits. We plan to calculate how hole qubits are affected by electric fields and magnetic fields, interactions with phonons, and other charge and magnetic noise in the environment. Finally, we also want investigate coupling two hole qubits.

This project would suit: Candidates interested in computational work, Matlap/Python/C/C++ experience useful. Undergrad background in quantum mechanics and solid state physics will help.

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://quantum.physics.unsw.edu.au/

Supervisor: Dr Peter Reece - p.reece@unsw.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Dr David Simpson (University of Melbourne)

Project information: This project aims to use current state-of-the-art nanoscale manufacturing capabilities to create optically trapped quantum nano-diamonds for precision magnetic sensing applications. These sensors are expected to be capable of performing nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy within a microscopic fluidic environment with high sensitivity and spatial selectivity. Optimisation of both optical and physical properties should ensure full orientation control inside an optical tweezers whilst maintaining long spin coherence times from nitrogen vacancy centre defects. This should have significant benefits for applications where precision magnetometry techniques can be applied to help impact physical and biomedical research into the future.

This project would suit: Experimental Physics, Optical Physics, Optoelectronics, Quantum Physics

Supervisor: Dr Andre Saraiva - a.saraiva@unsw.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Andrew Dzurak

Project information: Spins of electrons are among the most competitive qubit technologies, with a significant advantage in terms of its footprint on a quantum processor – the minute size of electrons mean a very dense arrangement of qubits is possible. More than desirable, achieving multi-million qubit processors is a necessity for the most interesting applications of quantum computation, because quantum error correction imposes large overheads in number of qubits needed to encode quantum information in a robust way. However, electrons are so small that interactions between spin qubits might require significant movement of these electrons in a two-dimensional semiconductor, which is a topic that only recently started being investigated.

This project will focus on quantum simulations of electronic wavefunctions in quantum dots that deform over time. This includes the lateral movement of this dot, neighbouring dots merging together, and the dot shape deforming significantly (altering its energy spectrum). The methods used here will be: (1) - fermionic path integral Monte Carlo, (2) - time-dependent density functional theory (within the multivalley effective mass approximation) and (3) - GW approximations (also within MV-EMA).

This project would suit: Background in solid state/semiconductor theory (undergraduate level), good programming skills and interest in electronic structure simulations.

Supervisor: Dr Andre Saraiva - a.saraiva@unsw.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Andrew Dzurak

Project information: When electromagnetic fields are pulsed in order to control qubits, we assume that a certain transformation occurs to the qubit in a controllable way. While calibration can be used to maximise the fidelity of the control, estimating small phase is hard, and moreover there are always unforeseen elements in a qubit that lead to small deviations from its ideal dynamics. This is particularly true for the most scalable qubit systems, based on solid state architectures (such as silicon-based quantum dots). These quantum processes can be directly measured by tomography techniques -- measuring different outcomes several times for the same process using different input states, we can reconstruct the real transformation caused by the pulses, agnostic to a microscopic model of the interactions.

Tomography of quantum processes can be challenging to perform for multi-qubit systems. Even a two-qubit system requires several hours of experiments and data analysis to provide any meaningful answer on the impact of a certain pulse on the qubits. We will develop new techniques that will speed up the estimation of particular elements of interest in a multiqubit process, using physical insight to minimise the amount of information required in order to reconstruct the errors and potentially correct them. The methods used in this project are: (1)- multiqubit quantum simulations; (2) - Bayesian estimation of quantum processes; (3) - Quantum algorithm-assisted phase estimation techniques.

This project would suit: Undergraduate level knowledge of quantum physics, interested in quantum information process, with emphasis on algebraic methods. Good ability to work in collaboration with experimentalists.

Supervisor: Dr Andre Saraiva - a.saraiva@unsw.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Andrew Dzurak

Project information: Ideal qubit operations always create the same transformation on the qubits. However, sometimes a gate operation causes disturbances in a solid state system that affect the operations following after, causing errors that depend on the context in which a gate is performed. The student will generate computer models of these errors and create simulated gate operations that have this type of behaviour using the multispinn simulation tool developed by our group. Using software available in the community for diagnostics of gate operations, the student will try to identify what would the outcomes of these analyses look when subject to these contextual errors. Finally, the student will try to recognise how to determine the presence of contextual errors in experiments based on the diagnostics.

This project would suit: Student with good programming skills and inclination for algebra. Some knowledge of quantum physics is desirable.

Supervisor: Dr Tuomo Tanttu - t.tanttu@unsw.edu.au

 

Project information: Recently the Ampere was redefined in the system of international units based on a electron charge. In this project we are studying how to implement this new quantum ampere directly based on a single-electron charge pump based on silicon MOS technology. The idea in a single-electron pump is to eject integer number of electrons through a quantum dot system to generate a quantized current that equals to I = n*e*f, where n is the number of electrons pumped, e is the electron charge, and f is the pumping frequency. To achieve sufficiently good pump we need high enough current yield and precise enough pumping process.

Understanding and counting the errors is one of the most important parts for a good current standard. In this project we aim to through simulation with COMSOL and/or cryogenic experiments the error processes and how to control the pumping errors and reduce them.

This project would suit: MOS technology, Metrology, Quantum transport

 

Secondary or co-supervisor: Prof. Andrew Dzurak

Supervisor: A/Prof Clemens Ulrich - c.ulrich@unsw.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Dr. Oleg Tretiakov

Project information: A skyrmion is an unconventional topological spin structure which consists of 10-100 nm large spin rotations. Their spin winding number is quantised, which makes them robust particle-like objects comparable to spin vortices at the nanometre scale with fascinating phenomena for fundamental research and future technological applications such as high-density, ultralow-power data storage devices. The project will focus on the investigation of these novel multifunctional materials by optical spectroscopy and advanced neutron and synchrotron techniques.

This project would suit: We are searching for an excellent and enthusiastic candidate. The project will offer a comprehensive training of highly advanced state-of-the-art experimental methods, e.g. neutron scattering, x-ray synchrotron techniques and optical Laser spectroscopy and is part of a major international collaboration.

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://www.physics.unsw.edu.au/our-research/research-areas/all-research-projects/clemens-ulrichs-research-projects

University of Sydney

Supervisor: A/Prof Ivan Kassal - ivan.kassal@sydney.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Possible co-supervision with Prof. Michael Biercuk if student is interested in experimental aspects

Project information: Chemistry and materials science are widely expected to be the first real-world problems where quantum computers will outperform conventional ones, largely due to the difficulty of representing quantum effects such as entanglement on classical computers.

Our group offers a range of projects at all levels aiming at developing and implementing novel quantum-computer simulation algorithms, with the objective of developing protocols for efficient and accurate quantum simulation that use existing, noisy quantum hardware. Possible topics include exciting extensions to our recent work showing how to simulate chemical dynamics on analog quantum simulators, identifying and benchmarking tough problems where quantum computers would offer the greatest advantage over classical ones, developing quantum techniques for simulating the outcomes of spectroscopy experiments, and collaborating with experimentalists to use existing quantum simulators to demonstrate chemical effects that are widely believed to be important in chemistry but have never been directly observed.

This project would suit: Physics students interested in quantum computing or quantum simulation, or chemistry students with a background in quantum chemistry.

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://www.kassal.group

Supervisor: Dr Sahand Mahmoodian - sahand.mahmoodian@sydney.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Professor Andrew Doherty

Project information: Experiments where laser light propagates through and interacts with a gas of atoms have been performed for decades. While these experiments have been modelled to varying degrees of success with theory, most approaches make approximations that break down when either the intensity of the laser field becomes sufficiently large, or when the number of atoms becomes sufficiently large. This project seeks to overcome these limitations by reducing the problem to solving the interaction between many photons and a single atom. This project will broaden our understanding of light-matter interaction and have significant implications on the generation of new quantum states of light.

This project would suit: Students with a strong theory background, and a background in quantum physics or quantum optics.

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://quantumopticstheorysydney.github.io/

Supervisor: Dr Sahand Mahmoodian - sahand.mahmoodian@sydney.edu.au

Project information: In vacuum, photons tend to interact linearly and simply propagate through one another. In nonlinear media, photons can interact with one another. At the quantum level this nonlinear interaction can lead to the emergence of quasi particles called photon bound states. These are entangled states where photons tend to propagate with one another, i.e., the detection of one photon is correlated with the detection of more photons. In nonlinear media, these photon bound states propagate with a velocity that depends on the number of photons. This project will further explore the behaviour of photon bound states in nonlinear media composed of atoms coupled to waveguides and will exploit their photon-number-dependent velocity to build new sources and detectors of quantum light.

This project would suit: Students with a strong background in quantum physics or quantum optics theory and good scientific programming skills.

 

Secondary or co-supervisor: Professor Andrew Doherty

 

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://quantumopticstheorysydney.github.io/

Supervisor: Dr Ting Rei Tan - tingrei.tan@sydney.edu.au

Project information: The project will follow a range of successful projects at the interface of cutting-edge trapped-ion experiment and quantum control. Topics to be explored include (i) exploration of new programmable quantum simulation protocols using linear ion chains, focussed on the simulation of chemical dynamics, (ii) development of new techniques in the measurement and characterisation of quantum systems, leveraging insights from the fields of robotic control and machine learning, and (iii) development, characterisation, and commissioning of experimental equipment including both ion-trap quantum computers and advanced hardware for precision frequency metrology.

This project would suit: We welcome students from all background. Applications from people of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds; equity target groups including women, people with disabilities, people who identify as LGBTIQ; and people of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander descent, are encouraged.

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://www.sydney.edu.au/science/our-research/research-areas/physics/quantum-science-group.html

Supervisor: Dr Robert Wolf - robert.wolf@sydney.edu.au

Secondary or co-supervisor: Michael Biercuk

Project information: Trapped atomic ions are a leading candidate system for experiments in quantum simulation and quantum-enhanced sensing. In quantum simulation, we attempt to realize a controllable quantum system capable of simulating more complex, uncontrolled quantum systems, e.g. for material discovery and design. Quantum-enhanced sensing can be used to perform ultra-sensitive force detection, as e.g. proposed for dark matter detection. This project will focus on the development of these types of experiments using large ion crystals in a Penning trap. This effort will build on successful experimental demonstrations of quantum control of hundreds of qubits and will leverage new insights into the manipulation and application of quantum systems.

This project will be conducted within the new Sydney Nanoscience Hub. This project will incorporate experience in experimental atomic physics, charged-particle trapping, custom experimental system design, and electromagnetic simulation. Multiple projects are on offer within this heading.

This project would suit: Students interested in experimental, precision measurements, quantum simulation, atomic physics

For more information, contact the project supervisor or visit: https://quantum.sydney.edu.au/research/quantum-control-laboratory/

Macquarie University

Supervisor: A/Prof Daniel Burgarth - daniel.burgarth@mq.edu.au

Project information: Quantum Control is about modelling and optimal driving of Quantum Technology. It's an area that is becoming increasingly important as high fidelity operations become more relevant. This is a theoretical project that involves development of analytical and numerical techniques to overcome noise in experimental setups.

This project would suit: Students with an interest in Physics, Engineering, Mathematics

For more information, contact the project supervisor on the above email.

Supervisor: Dr Zixin Huang - zixin.huang@mq.edu.au

Project information: This project aims at performing 3D sensing of field gradients. We will use tools from quantum metrology to develop optimal measurements. Potential applications include low-power, highly accurate measurements, applicable to stellar interferometry, microscopy, as well as navigation.

This project would suit: Students with a physics background.

For more information, contact the project supervisor on the above email.